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This is the most detailed map yet of our place in the universe

This really gives you an idea of how microscopic we all are. Scientists have created the most detailed map of the known universe and galaxies surrounding us:

This video shows in even more detail the structures of the universe and it is the best look I’ve seen so far at the way the universe is laid out and our teeny tiny little part of it:

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Sarah, Why Won’t You Help This Drunk Goon. Sarah, His Kayak Is Sinking

When you feel like your life is falling apart in every possible way and there’s nothing you can do, just remember this man’s struggle.

(via Sarah, Why Won’t You Help This Drunk Goon. Sarah, His Kayak Is Sinking - Digg)

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World First As Message Sent From Brain To Brain

One was assigned to a brain-computer interface to transmit the thought, while the three others were assigned to receive the thought. The first participant, located in India, was shown words translated into binary, and had to envision actions for each piece of information. For example, they could move their hands for a 1 or their legs for a 0. A technique known as electroencephalogry - which monitors brain signals from the outside - was used to record the thoughts as outgoing messages and send them via the internet. At the other end, electromagnetic induction was used to stimulate the brain’s visual cortex from the outside and pass on the signal successfully to the three other participants in France.

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1962 Austin-Healey 3000 BT7 Roadster

1962 Austin-Healey 3000 BT7 Roadster

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The Conservative Case for a Guaranteed Basic Income

It would be great if there was a policy like this that the left and right could agree on.

The idea isn’t new. As Frum notes, Friederich Hayek endorsed it. In 1962, the libertarian economist Milton Friedman advocated a minimum guaranteed income via a “negative income tax.” In 1967, Martin Luther King Jr. said, “The solution to poverty is to abolish it directly by a now widely discussed measure: the guaranteed income.” Richard Nixon unsuccessfully tried to pass a version of Friedman’s plan a few years later, and his Democratic opponent in the 1972 presidential election, George McGovern, also suggested a guaranteed annual income. Related Story A Rule for Conservative Anti-Poverty Plans: Keep It Simple

More recently, in a 2006 book, conservative intellectual Charles Murray proposed eliminating all welfare transfer programs, including Social Security and Medicare, and substituting an annual $10,000 cash grant to everyone 21 years and older. The Alaska Permanent Fund, funded by investments from state oil revenues, sends annual dividend checks to the state’s residents. Switzerland is voting on an unconditional basic income later this year. (Though the fundamental basic-income guarantee involves an unconditional grant to every citizen, no matter their wealth or age, other versions wouldn’t cut checks to those in top tax brackets or those receiving Social Security.)

Apart from lifting millions out of poverty, the plans promote efficiency and a shrinking of the federal bureaucracy. No more “79 means-tested programs.” Creating a single point of access would also make many recipients’ lives easier. If they knew they had something to fall back on, workers could negotiate better wages and conditions, or go back to school, or quit a low-paying job to care for a child or aging relative. And with an unconditional basic income, workers wouldn’t have to worry about how making more money might lead to the loss of crucial benefits. In the Financial Times, Martin Wolf has contemplated a guaranteed income’s ability to help society adjust to the disappearance of low-skill, low-wage jobs.

Yet the effort to create a reform conservatism and reconstitute the GOP as the “party of ideas” seems to demand contemplating legitimately radical new ideas on welfare reform. In the introduction to Room To Grow, Levin writes, “these ideas embody a conservative vision that sees public policy not as the manager of society but as an enabler of bottom-up incremental improvements.” Scott Winship, in a welfare-reform essay later in the same document, writes approvingly of Levin’s desire to provide an “alternative to the fundamentally prescriptive, technocratic approach inherent in the logic of the liberal welfare state.” A guaranteed income, in any form, would tear that logic apart. Maybe conservative welfare reform still has some room to grow.

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Road rage in Russia

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How to Yell at the FCC About How Much You Hate Its Net Neutrality Rules (only 2 days left!)

If you care about an internet in which you and other individuals can take part and publish things without being shut out by the will of large corporations to take it over for themselves, do something, and speak out this weekend!

Though it’s been a few months since the FCC voted to move forward with its horrible net neutrality rules, we’re now getting close to the finish line. The (extended) public comment period ends September 15, and the future of the internet is at stake. In fact, it’s up to you. “But how do I comment?” you ask, “How do I politely but firmly express my rage as a member of the public?” Let us show you the way. FCC Extends Net Neutrality Comment Deadline After Responses Crashed It

Step one: Visit FCC.gov/comments and find the proceeding with the title “Protecting and Promoting the Open Internet.” It should be the one on top and should also have over 20,000 filings in the last 30 days.

Step Two: Click the proceeding number “14-28.” You can also try to click this direct link, though it might not work every time. This will take you to the FCC’s Electronic Comment Filing System. It looks a little janky, but hey, the government built it.

Step Three: Fill out the form. Write about your feelings. Express your concerns. Air your grievances. Provide your real name and address. Hope for the best.

Step Four: Click “Continue” and make sure you like what you wrote. If you don’t you can modify your comment. If you do, click “Confirm.”

We asked the FCC what actually happens to these comments, after you send them off into cyberspace.

This is their response in full: To be clear: the NPRM approved by the FCC today has tentative conclusions on which we’re seeking comment, and many broad questions that we are seeking comment on. Once the comment period closes, we review the comments and apply them and the law to our proposals / questions, to come up with final rules. The Chairman has a goal for voting on final rules by the end of the year. Right now, it’s just proposals.

The initial public comment period lasts until July 15 and reply comments will be accepted until September 15. But you might as well get started now while the news is fresh. Do let us know how it goes!

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​The Future of Robot Labor Is the Future of Capitalism

Capital itself is the moving contradiction, [in] that it presses to reduce labour time to a minimum, while it posits labour time, on the other side, as sole measure and source of wealth.

In Marxist theory, capitalists create profit by extracting what’s called surplus value from workers—paying them less than what their time is worth and gaining the difference as profit after the commodity has been sold at market price, arrived at by metrics abstracted from the act of labour itself. So what happens when humans aren’t the ones working anymore?

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This is good news. Doing more with less. Now we just need to do it sustainably.

This is good news. Doing more with less. Now we just need to do it sustainably.

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Ice Bucket Challenge by Edvard Munch

Ice Bucket Challenge by Edvard Munch

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